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GET INVOLVED - ORGANISATIONS

NAPCAN > Get Involved – Me And My Organisation

BUSINESSES PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY SUPPORTING FAMILY FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENTS AND SPONSORING LOCAL COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS.

Ensure conditions of employment value parents and families. Parental and carers’ leave recognises the importance of parents having time to build relationships with newborns, to care for children and support each other. Such conditions show that you value your staff as parents as well as employees.

Have flexible, family friendly work conditions and job share available to staff who are parents and carers. Flexibility allows parents to meet the needs of their family, and better cope in times of stress.

Partner with a local community organisation or school to support children and families. For example, sponsoring a children’s sporting activity increases opportunity for families to be involved in their community.

Be family-friendly and welcome children, for example smiling at and acknowledging children through to providing a play area, that can be supervised by parents or staff, and provide baby change facilities in your business. This recognises the place of children in our society and improves families’ access to your business.

If you work with children and young people, develop policies and procedures to guide you and your employees: a child protection policy should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices, as well as be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation. Ensure and verify that all staff and volunteers engaged in child related work hold a valid Working With Children Check.

Also, a code of conduct for working with children and young people is a practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour. When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.

Think about safe and respectful ways to be an active bystander if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Apply for Family or Child Friendly Business Awards to have your efforts acknowledged. This will help raise the profile of child friendly businesses and increase understanding that protecting children is everyone’s business.

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Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

JULIA JONES : NEWBORN MOTHERS

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

I work with brand new mums in Perth and together we create a vision for their families. One of the ways we work towards this vision is by acknowledging that mothering is not an innate skill, we all are learning to be mothers. The new mums I work with choose to spend time with mothers who they would like as role models, and learn parenting skills, ways to deal with emotions, face challenges and build strong communication with their babies. I also really encourage dads’ involvement in their babies’ lives very early on, which has a huge impact for many years to come.

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RAY HALL : ECOZ ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

I make sure my workplace is family friendly. I let new parents bring their babies to work, including when they are out on field trips; I support parents to work from home if their kids are sick; I find ways to negotiate work hours for parents who use child care; and I look out for families who need time off and income when faced by crisis.

CARERS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUR COMMUNITY BY KEEPING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE SAFE AND PROVIDING THEM WITH A SAFE SPACE IN WHICH THEY CAN THRIVE AND GROW.

Anybody who may have children in their care at some time is classified as a Carer – for example: child care workers, early childhood professionals, foster carers, friends, healthcare professionals etc.

Being a carer can be challenging, remember, it’s OK to reach out and ask for support. Accept offers of help (especially the ones where cooked meals are involved!)

Share your experiences and skills with other carers, and link in with services that can support you and the child/children you are caring for.

Discover what helps reduce your stress, and assists you to best care for the children and young people in your life.
Take time out when you feel stressed or upset – it is important to look after yourself to ensure the best safety for the child/children you look after.

Be aware of the signs of child abuse and neglect and seek help for children who are at risk and who have been traumatised.

Get involved in your community. Joining sporting and other community groups will help you, the children and young people to have fun and meet people.

Encourage and help facilitate relationships with family members where it is possible.

Listen to the child/young person and involve them in planning things. This will support their developing identity and allow you to better meet their social and emotional needs.

Make plans for enjoyable “together time” – this can help build close relationships with those in your care.

Celebrate and support the achievements, values and interests of children/young people and support them when times are tough. This will build a strong bond that is loving and safe.

Talk about safety and what being unsafe might look and feel like at home, in their community, online or at school, with children and young people. Make plans about what to do if/when they feel uncomfortable and unsafe.

Attend a child safe training course or information session that will further develop your skills, knowledge and understanding.

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Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

NICOLE RYAN : MULTI MIX MOB

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Multi Mix Mob is an Indigenous playgroup and are playing their part by providing a safe environment for mums and bubs to attend. We provide the families with child focussed activities to help the bonding process and support parents with parenting workshops, health and wellbeing, family support services and education opportunities, all onsite in our playgroup. We are building strong parents and therefore strong children.

SANDRA DOUEIHI : BATHURST WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S REFUGE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Through my role at the Bathurst Women and Children’s Refuge I have developed a Protective Behaviours Program that I co-facilitate in pre-schools in Bathurst and also to children who come to the refuge. This program teaches children between the ages of two to five the vital information on how to keep safe, protect your body and distinguishing children’s feelings.

I was also privileged to be able to set up and co-ordinate the Love Bites Program developed by NAPCAN for high school students in the central West. This Program brings awareness to issues around domestic, family violence and sexual assault in an interactive way. Through my role as a child support worker I have been given the opportunity to enroll students into schools and pre-schools, assist with having children attend medical appointment that they might not have had the opportunity to go to, give out school uniforms – in particular jumpers – to local children walking past the refuge that are wearing only a t-shirt in the cold Bathurst winter, advocate on behalf of children and just be there as a supporting person for a child who does not have stabilities in their life.

As a person outside of my role at the refuge I am a volunteer mentor through SHINE for kids. I mentor a child who has had a parent involved in the criminal justice system. I have mentored  this child for three and a half years by providing an activity for the child every fortnight so the child has some form of stability in their life and an out from their home life.

COMMUNITY WORKERS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY SUPPORTING CARERS AND PARENTS, AS WELL AS BEING A ROLE MODEL FOR RESPECTFUL RELATIONSHIPS.

Be a positive role model, and a good influence for children and young people to learn from. Encourage young people to be positive role models and contribute to their community.

Consider the impact on children / young people when making service delivery decisions, ensure that the best interests of children and young people are at the focus of your work.

Promote youth events, support services, outreach programs and the agencies that provide them.

Encourage children/ young people to participate in their community and provide transport to reduce isolation for young people, where possible.

Talk with and listen to children you work with, and involve them in the planning of activities and program development. Make sure they are always engaged in decisions that impact on their lives.

Be approachable and youth friendly. A code of conduct for working with children and young people is a practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour.

Develop child/youth related policies and procedures for your workplace. Child Protection Policies should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices and be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation.

Ensure that all staff and volunteers engaged in child related work hold a valid Working With Children Check. When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.

Build positive relationships with children as well as other community workers to help gain an informed, well-balanced perspective to give advice on improving relationships and inform best practice.

Support parents to access other services that can increase their parenting skills and knowledge.

Think about safe and respectful ways to be an active bystander if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Congratulate families and young people when you see or hear good things happening.

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Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

GEOFF BAHNERT : ADULTS SURVIVING CHILD ABUSE - ASCA NT DIRECTOR

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

ASCA believes that by assisting those adults who suffered abuse when they were children, will assist them in the stage of life when they are the caregivers of their own children and reduce the likelihood of a continuing cycle of abuse and neglect.

Our vision is to provide a world without child abuse and to advance the wellbeing of people and communities affected by child abuse.

GUY ROSS : DARWIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

We run family concerts which are a positive experience for parents, carers and children. The concerts aim to be fun and inspire young people through their first musical experience. An example was called “Animals of the circus and a few creepy critters” at the Territory Wildlife Park.

LOCAL GOVERNMENTS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY PROVIDING FREE FAMILY EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES TO CREATE OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE TO ENGAGE IN COMMUNITY LIFE.

Create opportunities for young people to engage in community and civic life. The provision of a youth space, as well as genuine participation about issues that affect them, celebrates young people’s place in our society and helps business deliver best practice.


Offer free family events and activities for children. Community cultural events and opportunities for recreation help build connections between families and young people. Accessibility is increased when events are run free of charge.

Invite senior community leaders to speak at an event or service. Hearing about and valuing local culture and wisdom helps families learn and grow together and strengthens community bonds.

Initiate a local Child Friendly Business Award for organisations who exceed expectations in meeting the needs of children. Recognising businesses efforts helps raise the profile of children, needs of families in our society, and the role that businesses should play in their community.

Develop child related policies and procedures. A child protection policy should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices, as well as be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation. Ensure that all staff and volunteers engaged in child related work hold a valid Working With Children Check.

A code of conduct for working with children and young people is a practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour. When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.

Help and support parents in continuous improvement of their parenting skills. Providing family support services and parenting courses help to overcome the challenges of parenting, and creates opportunities for support, skill development and networking with other families.

Ensure community services and events are accessible to isolated families by providing outreach programs and free or low cost transport.

Promote and support the local library as an ideal location to share information, promote quality time between parents and children and build social connections between families.

Provide opportunities for children to play and have fun: playgroup, parks, libraries, safe streets, parent-friendly parking and safe bike paths encourage play, exercise and social get-togethers amongst children, parents and families.

Share a directory of local services in the council’s facilities. By simplifying processes for accessing support, families are assisted in seeking help to raise their children.

Provide high quality, flexible and accessible child care options to allow parents to engage in the workforce or to invest in other aspects of family or community life. Consider the cost and location of services in order to meet the diverse needs of families.

Where possible, seek input about council services from senior community or family members. Valuing local culture and wisdom may improve your relationships and can help increase knowledge about community needs.

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Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

GOLD COAST CITY COUNCIL

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Gold Coast City Council delivers a range of activities that respond to the needs and aspirations of young people in Gold Coast City, within the scope of the roles and responsibilities of local government, such as the the Junior Council’s involvement in the Homeless Connect program. See Council’s website for details.

SEAN PARDY : YOUTH SERVICES OFFICER - DARWIN CITY COUNCIL

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

We facilitate a Youth Advisory Group (YAG) who provide advice to council on a range of issues, especially those that effect young people. YAG is also involved in organising events,  such as a quiz night to raise money for the Action for Change Foundation, a volunteer run training school in Dili.

Darwin City Council produces GRINDonline – a website for young people, by young people. The GRIND network also assists YAG to support community organisations host events, such as through in kind “Gig Gear”.

DAMIEN RYAN : MAYOR OF ALICE SPRINGS - ALICE SPRINGS TOWN COUNCIL

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Alice Springs Town Council works with our community to make Alice Springs a clean, safe and enjoyable town for everyone to live, work or visit. Our Council provides many facilities: an aquatic & leisure Centre, sporting fields, & the Public Library for our community as a secure learning environment for kids and their parents. It’s important for all to play their part in making the community safe for our kids.

I work with youth groups across our town, including Clontarf Football Academy and Centralian Girls Academy.

THE MEDIA CAN PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY CHALLENGING NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES AND REPORTING ON CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION INITIATIVES.

Communicate and work with child abuse prevention organisations to develop effective responses to instances of harmful behaviour towards children and young people.

Avoid negative or unfair stereotypes of communities and cultural groups.

Convey child protection and child abuse prevention as being everyone’s business.

Promote a balanced perspective of young people. Share stories of young people who are engaged positively in their families, schools and communities.

Recognise and seek out the voice of young people in other stories, not just those that involve abuse or neglect. Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child states that: Children have the right to express their opinions freely, and have their opinions taken into account in matters that affect them.  

Make the federal, state and local governments accountable for upholding Child Abuse and Neglect standards in terms of Australian legislation and policy.

Feature interviews with leading child abuse prevention experts when possible, so that the Australian community has a more informed public debate on prevention.

The digital media industry can partner with child abuse prevention experts to help keep all children and young people smart and safe online and offline. Working together, messages about the respectful use of technology in relationships and providing young people and children with knowledge and skills to manage their digital use can play a part in keeping them safe online and offline.

Provide details of support services when possible to encourage help seeking behaviours. Increasing families’ access to services and events can decrease their isolation and risk of child abuse.

Be aware of the impact of sexualised images of young people, remembering that children and young people are also exposed to the media.

Be a positive role model. Children and young people learn from the sources of information they are exposed to, so make your influence positive!

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Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

MIRIAM RAPHAEL : MANAGING EDITOR, OFF THE LEASH - ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT MAGAZINE, NT

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Off the Leash is a free, monthly publication of “what’s on” for the arts and entertainment in the Top End of Australia. We include a “Kids page” which features a listing of events, with a focus on those which are free. We’ve also featured family-friendly restaurants and cafes, as well as day trips for the family. We are open for contributions from all members of the community. It’s also free to list your arts, cultural or arts related entertainment event. We hope that by increasing access to events and entertainment, families are supported to have fun together, and perhaps get involved in the community.

PHILIPPA MCDONALD : SENIOR REPORTER, ABC TV NEWS

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

The ABC takes the treatment and dignity of children and young people so seriously it’s enshrined in our editorial policies. It’s indeed our responsibility to take extreme care regarding the physical and emotional welfare of children who find themselves in the news.

JULIE MCCROSSIN : JOURNALIST / BROADCASTER

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

As a journalist and facilitator of community events, I take every opportunity to give children a voice. We can ask children and young people to speak, interview them, show their art work or photography or invite them to perform music or rap. There is no substitute for hearing the feelings, thoughts and experience of young people directly. Plus they bring energy, informality and hope to any conference or event.

POLICE PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY BEING APPROACHABLE AND EDUCATING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE ON HOW TO BE SAFE.

Be a positive role model and influence for children and young people to look up to.
Develop policies and procedures that convey the law in a way that any person can understand.

Child Protection Policies should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices and be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation.

When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.
Consider the impact on children/young people when making service delivery decisions.

Develop and share a directory of local services in police stations that can support families.

Involve yourself in community events and network across sectors to build trusting relationships and develop balanced well- informed perspectives on children and young people.

Congratulate families and young people when you see or hear good things happening.
Be approachable and youth friendly.

Developing and adhering to a code of conduct for working with children and young people at your station is a practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour.

Think about safe and respectful ways to offer assistance if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Download PDF

Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

RON HALLIDAY : NSW POLICE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Being a positive and supportive role model to high school students. Actively involved in promoting a safe and friendly learning environment for young people to learn in. Assisting young people reach their full potential by encouraging them, and assisting where possible, to have a go. Creating a safer environment by giving schools and the wider community advice on cyber crime, domestic violence, sexual assault & community neglect. Being available anytime for advise.

DETECTIVE SUPERINTENDENT TODD HUNTER : AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

The AFP has a significant role to play in ensuring children and young people are safe, no matter what environment they are in. In fulfilling this role, the AFP has forged strong partnerships with all Australian law enforcement agencies, many international agencies, government departments, industry and not-for-profit organisations.

The AFP is involved in many crime prevention and awareness raising initiatives, particularly in relation to keeping young people safe online. As Manager of Cyber Crime Operations, I am responsible for activities associated with combating online crime and making the internet safer for children.

The AFP, through its High Tech Crime Operations unit, is responsible for the investigation of crimes associated with online child sex exploitation and child sex tourism.

For more information on Child Protection Operations, visit the AFP website:http://www.afp.gov.au/policing/child-protection-operations.aspx

HEALTH PRACTITIONERS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY BEING INFORMED OF THE LINKS BETWEEN ABUSE, EARLY INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION, AS WELL AS BEING ACCESSIBLE AND SUPPORTIVE OF FAMILIES WHO NEED ASSISTANCE.

Share your knowledge in your community to increase awareness of child development, and how adults can support this.

Become informed on the links between abuse, early intervention and prevention. Seek out the opinions of child abuse prevention experts.

Be family-friendly by welcoming children with a smile. The provision of a play area and baby change facilities in your health centre or waiting room demonstrates the value of children and supports families’ accessing your service.

Ensure health services are accessible to isolated families by providing outreach. Advocate for free or low cost transport as a means of assistance.

Ask all parents how they’re coping and talk to them about the challenges of parenting.  Support parents to improve their parenting skills. Introduce them to family support services and parenting courses. Explain that they don’t have to wait until they have problems before they can open themselves to learning more.

Share a directory of local services in your health centre and surrounding areas. By improving familiarity and simplifying processes for accessing support, families are assisted in seeking help where and when it’s needed.

Develop child focused policies and procedures for your practice, health centre or hospital. A child protection policy should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices. It should provide information on how to recognise and document the signs and symptoms of child abuse, and how to respond in accordance with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation.

A code of conduct for working with children and young people is another practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour. When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.

Engage with children and young people: as well as investigating symptoms or problems, it is important to talk with young people about their experiences. By using age-appropriate language and listening to what they have to say, you will build trusting relationships.

Think about safe and respectful ways to be an active bystander if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Download PDF

Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

SUE PACKER : PAEDIATRICIAN

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

First- Remember that my patient is the child- even if the parent might do most of the talking. Listen to the child – even babies can tell you a lot about how they feel about their life and experiences.

Secondly – catch the parents doing something good- we so often ignore good parenting and only notice the bad bits.

JANE POOLE : KORMILDA COLLEGE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

As part of my role as a nurse at Kormilda, I have been available to students of the college who have come to me with concerns for themselves or for their friends. Often students are worried that a friend may be in an unsafe relationship, have been hurt or mistreated by family.

Developing relationships with students has been vital in having them feel comfortable in coming to the clinic for either themselves or on behalf of friends.

Nursing staff have worked to foster a safe, caring and non-judgement environment that allows students to raise concerns without fear. Often times, students present complaining of vague illnesses. It is not unusual for young people to ‘test’ an adult out with small issues before feeling safe enough to speak about bigger ones.

Spending time with students who present frequently with these types of symptoms and talking through issues can lead to disclosures. When a disclosure is made, support and information is provided to the students through either networking with internal or external counselling, health checks, time out space and/or ongoing contact.

Staff is aware of the legislative requirements but also indicators of child harm to heighten awareness within our community. In addition, staff are advised that we are available and willing to support them should the need arise to make a Mandatory Report.

POLITICIANS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUR COMMUNITY BY PROMOTING CHILD PROTECTION AS A COMMUNITY RESPONSIBILITY AND ENDORSING FAMILY FRIENDLY POLICIES.

Be a positive role model. Be aware of your behaviour, what you say, how you say it and the way you act. Children and young people learn from the people they listen to, so make your influence positive!

Be aware that child abuse occurs across all communities and cultural groups. Promote child protection and spread the word that child abuse prevention is everyone’s business.

Follow the principle of the environmental impact model, consider the impact of all legal, policy and service delivery reform on children. Ask yourself: where are the children in this change?

Become informed on the link between abuse and prevention of abuse. Ask for briefings which include information from child abuse prevention experts and be well-informed on the latest research.

Promote a long term view to child safety and wellbeing by addressing the overloading of child protection, health, housing  and education systems. Invest in prevention strategies and early intervention services to reduce the risk of families’ problems worsening over time and heading into a cycle of abuse.

Endorse family friendly policies across the workforce. Flexible work hours, job sharing and the provision of paid Parental Leave demonstrates that members of society are valued as parents as well as employees.

Implement universal home visiting to families at the birth of their first child. Support to new families at this time has been shown by the David Old’s model to prevent health and developmental problems for children.

Listen to and engage with the opinions of youth delegations. Refer to Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: Children have the right to express their opinions freely, and have their opinions taken into account in matters that affect them.


Encourage organisations that work with children and young people to develop child-safe policies and procedures. A child protection policy should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices, as well as be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation, including ensuring that all staff and volunteers engaged in child related work hold a valid Working With Children Check.

A code of conduct for working with children and young people is another  practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour. When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.

Download PDF

Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUR COMMUNITY BY SUPPORTING FAMILIES AND PROMOTING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S HEALTH AND WELLBEING.

Be a positive role model. Children and young people learn from the people that they spend time with, so make your influence positive.

Facilitate a youth friendly environment by creating opportunities for children and young people to engage in and be heard. This could include providing a youth space, holding a community event to showcase children’s achievements, or developing a youth action network.

Become informed on the indicators and risks of child abuse and neglect as well as preventative measures. This will increase your awareness of how to support families in your community and prevent such harm from happening.

Develop means for family networking and support groups through your communication channels such as notice boards, newsletters, online and social media or offering practical support. Reach out to families who are isolated. Be available and approachable.

Develop child related policies and procedures. Child Protection Policies should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices and be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation. A code of conduct for working with children and young people is another practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour. Ensure that all staff and volunteers engaged in child related work hold a valid Working With Children Check. When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation.

Support Schools in their promotion of children and young people’s safety and wellbeing. Openly encourage reviews of pastoral care systems to ensure they are meeting the needs of staff and students.

Consider the impact on children / young people when making service delivery decisions.

Be open to making connections with any child, young person or community member who needs your support regardless of cultural background or religious beliefs, to further perpetuate an environment of acceptance and tolerance.

Think about safe and respectful ways to be an active bystander if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Download PDF

Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

ISMAIL DAVIDS : GLOBAL ISLAMIC YOUTH CENTRE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Our centre revolves around youth from the Muslim community, engaging with and providing a safe haven for them, while allowing them see the part they play as members in the bigger society and how being Muslim does not mean they are not Australian. This helps them to become positive contributors to the overall Australian community and to be good role models at school.

All our events are aimed at getting the youth more involved in a positive and productive environment that occupies their time doing good, wholesome activities and also allows them to build relationships in a fun and welcoming environment. Our mentoring and educational activities are aimed at making them understand the importance of a good education and the benefits it has in future employment opportunities.

We run a series of events and regular activities throughout the year to cater for the wellbeing of children and families generally. Activities include: Lectures on parenting, religious classes, social events, mother and daughter boat cruises, school holiday sport and craft days as well as a playgroup. We also have a charity branch that oversees refuge homes and regular charity activities that cater for the many in our community who live below average standards and are regularly in need of help and support. We also provide family and youth counselling services.

YIANNA PATERAKIS : CATHOLICCARE (NT)

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

Every time I go to church I light a candle for the young people I work with. I have been raised a Greek Orthodox and able to practice my beliefs through the work I do at CatholiCare NT. I work with young people everyday providing counselling and support. Young people amaze me, the energy they have and the way they can laugh from within their soul. When I am working with young people I acknowledge their strength and praise their achievements. I want them to know their potential and help them come up with dreams and goals that they can reach for. Sometimes when things are really really tough for my clients I pray to Saint Basil, he is the patron Saint for the protection of children, I pray that their lives are always safe and they find right ways to tackle the problems they have to face.

SHOPS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY PROVIDING FAMILY FRIENDLY WORKING ENVIRONMENTS AND DISPLAYING COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS AND EVENTS.

Be a positive role model. Be aware of your behaviour, what you say, how you say it and the way you act. Children and young people learn from the people they listen to, so make your influence positive!

Have family friendly work conditions available to staff who are parents. Flexibility allows parents to meet the needs of their family and to cope in times of stress.

Welcome children with a smile. Consider your manner and listen to what young people say. Consider providing a play area or colouring competition in your shop to demonstrate your recognition of children and support of families’ access to your products.

Consider the impact of product placement on children and young people. Limit access to products which are a risk to physical safety (e.g. knives, chemicals), physical health (junk food) and identity development (media which includes sexualised images of young women).

Display information about community events and opportunities for recreation. Increasing access to events will support families to get involved in their community.

Partner with a local community organisation or school to support children and families. For example, sponsoring a child’s sporting activity increases opportunity for families to be involved in their community.

Think about safe and respectful ways to be an active bystander if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Download PDF

Download the Play Your Part factsheet for friends.

CAROLINE ATWOOL : CO-OWNER OF THE EARTH FOOD STORE, BONDI

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

The Earth Food store is a child friendly, stroller friendly, welcoming and inclusive organic shop and cafe. It is a place where mothers with young children, pregnant women, and families can come and connect with the local community while they do a shop, I have taken the time to create a safe and happy environment where parents feel they can come to get assistance, meet other parents, have a bite to eat and feel part of the local community. I think its important that more shops promote a connected local organisation that people can drop in and feel like they can be supported. The Earth Food Store also has a kids menu, and is informed of the local community services and assistance programs for anyone whom asks. Keeping kids safe means more than serving baby-chinos.

ROSLYN SAKREWSKI : HAIR SALON

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

As a local shopkeeper in Bondi, I have been seeing families grow up over the past 16 years. Children are passing my salon on their way to school, and everyone is keeping an eye out for them and each other. In our community, everyone helps each other; and us shopkeepers on Campbell Prd are just trying to be aware of the children in the area; where they are and what they are surrounded with, it’s a big community feel here.

I try to keep my radar up on odd behaviour outside my shop by adults, but also if kids in my shop are behaving or saying something inappropriate for their age I would alert their parents to ensure they are aware of what might be going on in that child’s life. Finally, as a shopkeeper I think it is important to make children and families with children feel welcome at my shop and let parents know that their children will be looked after.

TEACHERS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS WITH THEIR STUDENTS AND SHOWING THAT THEY RESPECT AND VALUE THEM.

In the classroom:

  • Build positive relationships with the students in your class. By being approachable and listening to them, you show young people that they are important and that you care.
  • Include students in planning: by listening to what young people have to say on issues that affect them (such as their education), you will work to ensure that they feel heard and that you can appropriately address their needs.
  • Share details of local youth events and services by setting up an information board or online network within your classroom or school. Encourage help seeking behaviour by discussing the role of community services and how young people can access them.
  • Have discussions about difficult topics such as bullying, exam stress, mental health and different types of abuse. Ensure conversations aim to develop young people’s strengths and resilience.
  • Be aware of the signs children and young people may show that are indicators of child abuse and neglect and further inform yourself of the mandatory reporting principles.
  • Consider facilitating education on child abuse and violence prevention.

Whole of School Approach to Child Abuse and Violence Prevention Education:

As children spend much of their time at school, classrooms are safe, structured environments that can provide child abuse and violence prevention education.

NAPCAN is involved in the implementation of child abuse prevention programs in primary and secondary schools around Australia, through the Love Bites, All Children Being Safe, and #Friends programs. Informed by this experience and also best practice standards for respectful relationships education; some of the key learning from this work includes:

  • Engaging and consulting a variety of stakeholders within the school to ensure consistent messages are provided to young people.
  • School audits to ensure policies are effective and identify any areas where additional policies need to be implemented.
  • Programs delivered to students provide age appropriate material.
  • Engage parents and community members to assist in making materials relevant to local issues/concerns.
  • Prioritising the safety of children and young people by linking them with supports in their community and having facilitators that work within a Code of Conduct and that programs have dedicated time for planning.
  • Including young people in the development, evaluation and review of programs ensures prevention programs are engaging. It also means the program is informed by the experiences of children and young people.
  • Aligning programs with existing curriculum supports teachers to more readily integrate key child protection learning outcomes as required.
  • Delivery of professional development to school staff, regarding child abuse and violence prevention, can increase teachers’ skills and confidence in the delivery of prevention programs; as well as their response to individual students’ concerns.

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JACKIE HAINES : MILLNER PRIMARY SCHOOL

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

As a primary school teacher, I believe that developing a sense of wellbeing within a school is as important as developing literacy or numeracy skills (if not more so).

I try to foster a classroom environment that is welcoming, fair and respectful to all. I find that developing these foundations and expectations are important in setting children up for success, for building their confidence and in making them feel valued. Being reflective about my own practice and providing time for rich discussion around these themes is also a winner.

KATHRYN BERMINGHAM : DEPUTY PRINCIPAL, DUBBO COLLEGE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

I meet with teachers regularly to check if everything is going alright with the kids – I tell them to keep an eye on what is happening in class rooms. Youth Connect is an external agency that attends the school and helps us getting children involved in after-school experiences, giving them work connections and helping them with TAFE classes.

We also send the children on cultural and career excursions to help them develop outside of school and run sporting and community events at school.

We encourage staff to get professional development to grow while teaching. I personally keep up with the department’s code of conduct, the staff are trained on it as well as a mandatory part of their education, and new teaching initiatives.

A constant communication between parents and guardians is vital in keeping children safe and cared for. Informing parents about good things happening at school is as important as letting them know as soon as possible if something is troublesome.

JEANETTE TROTTER : TEMPE HIGH SCHOOL

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

We have adopted a whole school approach to making sure that students acquire personal skills needed to keep themselves safe. Through programs such as “Love Bites”, “Peer Support” and “Respectful Relationships”, we are empowering our students, developing connections and creating a sense of belonging within the Tempe High School community.

YOUTH WORKERS PLAY THEIR PART TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY BY SUPPORTING THEM TO PARTICIPATE IN THEIR COMMUNITY. THEY ALSO CONTINUOUSLY ADVOCATE FOR THE BEST INTERESTS OF YOUNG PEOPLE.

Be a positive role model. Be aware of your behaviour, what you say, how you say it and the way you act. Children and young people learn from the people they spend time with, so make your influence positive!

Encourage young people to be positive role models themselves and contribute to their community.

Promote youth events and support services, and support children/young people to actively participate in their community.

Reduce isolation for young people by offering outreach programs and transport.

Consider the impact on children / young people when making service delivery decisions.

Be approachable and youth friendly. Build positive working relationships with child protection workers – it creates a consistency of care and allows you to advocate for the child/young person.

Develop policies and procedures for your workplace. Child Protection Policies should promote wellbeing and early intervention practices and be consistent with state/territory mandatory reporting legislation. Ensure that you, all staff and volunteers engaged in child related work hold a valid Working With Children Check.

When implemented and supported consistently, these policies work to protect children, workers and the organisation. A code of conduct for working with children and young people is a practical tool for promoting clear and consistent roles and behaviour.

Provide a family friendly space that welcomes children, young people and parents. For example, safe play areas and baby change facilities show families they are valued.

Assist parents with accessing services that can increase their parenting skills and knowledge and/or provide them with additional support.

Think about safe and respectful ways to be an active bystander if you see an adult being inappropriate towards a child or young person.

Congratulate families and young people when you see or hear good things happening.

Value local culture and wisdom and where possible seek input from senior community or family members to improve relationships and inform best practice.

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JESSICA BROWN : LIFE CHANGING EXPERIENCES FOUNDATION

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

I am the founder of a mentoring program called the SISTER2sister program which is an initiative of Life Changing Experiences Foundation. This 12 month mentoring and risk management program matches teenage girls at risk with professional women from the community who support them to overcome their obstacles and focus on their bright futures.

The primary cause being addressed are teenage girls at risk of neglect &/or physical, sexual, emotional abuse, circumstances of poverty, cultural isolation, disability, exposure to substance abuse and/or terminal illness among other issues. Also addressed, is a lack of a positive role model, the inability to envisage a life outside their present circumstances, & the lack of motivation/inspiration enabling them to learn new skills, overcome obstacles and thus break the cycle.

To hear more from CEO Jessica Brown watch the video.

TOBY FINLAYSON : DESERT PEA MEDIA

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN THEIR COMMUNITY:

 

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO “PLAY YOUR PART” TO PROTECT AND CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN YOUR COMMUNITY:

Desert Pea Media is an indigenous media organisation, operating in regional and remote communities around Australia since 2002.

I play my part to keep children safe and cared for by trying to create a community driven dialogue around local social issues, also advocating awareness and understanding of these issues within the local community. We create this dialogue by using contemporary and popular media forms such as theatre, film and hip hop in a unique ‘peer-to-peer’ mentoring process.

Before becoming co-director at Desert Pea Media, I completed my training in the Love Bites program and am very well aware of the problem of domestic and sexual violence prevention. I focus on facilitating the workshops and also creating high-end media outcomes to raise awareness of these issues.